by Michael O'Neill
March 11th, 2013

When I was a B2B marketing executive in the 1990s, we ran marketing “campaigns”.

My team focused on a about 100 big initiatives throughout the year including a dozen trade shows where we exhibited and spoke, a monthly email newsletter, a media relations effort focused on a few dozen press releases and pitches, a few white papers, a product launch or two, and the creation of print brochures and other materials.

With maybe 100 discrete things that we did during the year, each one could be measured.

From one hundred things a year to ten thousand

Marketing has fundamentally shifted.

Rather than doing a hundred really big projects, today’s marketers need to do tens of thousands of tiny things each year to be successful.

It’s not about the campaign, it’s about engagement.

- Rather than a dozen trade shows to exhibit and speak at, marketers need to create a 24×7 virtual showcase on the web. We need to create tons of individual articles, photos, infographics, videos, and other content to make a site strong. That means lots of very small projects instead of a dozen big ones.

- Your monthly email newsletter is fine. But what about a daily blog post? What about 20 or 30 daily tweets? Then you’ve got your LinkedIn, Facebook, and other social feeds.

- A decade ago your media relations effort probably focused on a few dozen press releases and media pitch campaigns in a year. Now you can engage journalists in real-time at the precise moment they are looking for information.

As you do the ten thousand, the nature of how you measure success changes.

Are you doing the ten thousand? Or are you still focused on the hundred?

This article first appeared at David Meerman Scott’s blog Web Ink Now. Re-published with permission.

To receive our updates: