by Michael O'Neill
January 9th, 2014

The CES (Consumer Electronics Show) is a yearly event held early January in Las Vegas, Nevada, where the latest and greatest in consumer tech is shown off. The whole world watches CES as that’s where the stage is set for the new trends of the year. Companies clamour to get noticed and be heard above the noise, which is especially loud considering the sheer volume of attendees. The task of standing out is made more difficult for Chinese companies who may not be as familiar with the US market. So what can they do?

Focus on the product
Reporters and consumers at CES generally do not care about a company’s latest hires or new business division. Remember that the show is about consumers and products first. A company needs to have a very strong product offering that is the centre of their presence at CES.

Make the story bigger
Even though products should come first at CES, companies shouldn’t get too focused on the minutiae of said products. Don’t dwell on impersonal facts and figures about your products like how much memory it has or its speed; instead tell a story about how using it changes people’s lives. Make the product bigger than just itself and show how it fits into the trends of today’s technology landscape.

Be creative
As media face-time will be limited and full of distraction on the CES showroom floor, companies that want in-depth coverage could forgo a booth for a hotel suite. In the suite they can set up product demos, have executives on site to answer questions and invite a stream of different media for one-on-one or group sessions.

To have a CES success, Chinese companies that are eager to prove should remember to first focus on the product, then make the story bigger and be creative to stand out from the crowd. Doing this will reap real business benefits for the company and develop strong relationships with media and influencers that will be advocates on their behalf.

Brad Williams is president of the Technology Practice, North America, at Weber Shandwick

This article first appeared at Weber Shandwick’s China website

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